Erasing Detroit

 

Along with shrinkage of Detroit, the project “Erasing Detroit” seems representative of the transition which the city is experiencing these days [1]. The city government spends a large portion of its budget just to remove old, vacant housings [1]. This is already an important growing business in Detroit [1]. It is interesting to see the repetitive, multiple steps of tearing down a house. Workers first get rid of the façade of the house, tear down inner structure, and separate some useful materials for their future use. These steps imply the demolishing also takes steps, in the way one would go through to build house. This also can be considered as a long time frame of Detroit since it has been going a series of crises, starting with Great Fire in 1805 and following economic downturns throughout its history. Some also imply that demolishing is not always a bad thing if done in the right way, and often necessary in order for a new project to take off [2].

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Fig. 1: In the project “Erasing Detroit,” workers tear down the façade of a house first, and sort out what they can still use in the end. Source: Stalking Detroit, 2001 [1]

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Fig. 2: In the project “Erasing Detroit, the areas in the map painted in solid black means vacant buildings are torn down in those blocks. Source: Stalking Detroit, 2001 [2]


 

Work Cited

  1. Daskalakis, G., Waldheim, C., & Young, J. (2001). Stalking Detroit. Barcelona: Actar.
  2. Detroit Future City. 2012 Detroit Future City. (2nded.). (2013). Detroit: Inland Press.

List of Figures

  1. Daskalakis, G., Waldheim, C., & Young, J. (2001). Stalking Detroit. Barcelona: Actar. (p. 103).
  2. Daskalakis, G., Waldheim, C., & Young, J. (2001). Stalking Detroit. Barcelona: Actar. (p. 100).